Collection: PART 1

Illustration

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Since his earliest practice, begun in the late 1960s, Long has based his art on the action of walking in the natural landscape. With his seminal work, A Line Made By Walking 1967 (Tate P07149) – a photograph showing a straight line worn in a field of grass by the repeated movement of the artist’s feet over it – Long established the simple act of walking as a gesture of primordial mark-making fundamental to the creation of art. In the context of late 1960s conceptualism, Long’s act may be seen as a subversion of the traditionally expressive gesture central to painting. Walking is non-expressive, a mechanical movement which permits the body to travel from one point to another. In a similar way, the line joining one point to another is fundamental to the process of drawing – the logical means of connection on which cartography is based. In the 1970s Long extended his process of making transient marks on the landscape to include another primordial human activity: the collection and organisation of raw materials found within the environment. Over the decades he has extended the straight line to encompass the cross, the square, the circle, the spiral, concentric rings, parallel lines, crooked lines, the heap, the dribble, the scratch; every possible means of making marks in nature with what is to hand, using simple actions with the artist’s hands or feet, is covered in Long’s oeuvre. He has worked in many different kinds of terrain, walking extensively in England, particularly in the south west which is his home, and travelling to far off, spectacular wild landscapes. The pictures are often as much a record of Long’s experience of being in extreme deserted places as they are of the simple ephemeral art work being created in the environment.

SOURCE: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/long-sahara-circle-t12036/text-summary

Long's work is similar to Fulton's in that it evokes the idea of connecting with ancient humanity. However, I love the idea of using the surroundings to make marks - the arrangements are reminiscent of crop circles or perhaps pagan symbols. Again, concepts I have loved and will continue to love and want to explore later on. In terms of my current work, both Fulton and Long are very different to what I am doing - I think my piece will simply capture the essence of the place as opposed to imply ideas about ancient times. If I were to do this in future I would try to go somewhere different that is less modern, perhaps, and attempt to add more layers of meaning to the piece.

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Sahara Circle - Richard Long

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Solaris 1 - Christiane Baumgartner

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Manhatten Transfer - Christiane Baumgartner

Baumgartner's intense mark making is very inspiring - I think that complex prints are the most striking. I want to do something that is very detailed - perhaps do like her and try and capture the pixels of the photo? I will have to see when I begin to draw - still not entirely sure how I will illustrate the place yet.

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Triptychon - Christiane Baumgartner

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Ignacia Ruiz
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Umberto Giovannini

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Liverpool Street London - Umberto Giovannini

I love the fuzziness of this piece and the introduction of colour. I have realised that I actually prefer black and while prints when they are very clearly cut - like lino prints, for example - but some colour with many makes can make something that is often very clean and clear become quite strange and beguiling to look at. This makes the print seem more photographic or like a painting. I think this makes a piece more interesting - for example when you find out that a hyper-realist painting is indeed a painting and not a photograph, there is always a sense of shock and awe. I want to try an experiment with this but possibly later down the line - the style in which I'm drawing does not really allow me to try and create a painterly texture. 

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ILLUSTRATION

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9 degrees. 16.46. 2/10/16. White sun. A palace of gluttony. Red doors many people. Many people red doors sickly. Huge floor to ceiling stretching upwards and upwards and upwards upwards. Lines and faces leering out of chocolate. Grotesque angels and decaying devils. Spiders and people and demons. All crafted. And then bags and bags and bags and busy. White and dark and milk and milk with berries and white with nuts and dark with salt and dark with berries and nuts and white with salt and milk with caramel and. Upstairs? No. Red inside and out. Crystal montages. Crystal windows. Huge stretching and up repeated. White and huge and towering towers of sugar. Flowers blossoming from torrents. Bags and bags and masks and faces and mirrors and you. Woman talking talking job? Yes. No? Chocolate? Please. White with nuts and dark with matcha and milk with nothing. Milk with nothing milk with nothing. Heat. Long line. Invest? Money? No. We have a tv show. Oh wow how wonderful well I've never heard of it have you? No? Shame. Food network? I have freeview. Colours very red but also very brown and melting. Surely in summer this is disgusting.
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"Since the early 1970s Hamish Fulton (born 1946) has been labelled as a sculptor, photographer, Conceptual artist and Land artist. Fulton, however, characterises himself as a 'walking artist'.

Fulton first came to prominence in the late 1960s as one of a number of artists – including Richard Long and Gilbert & George – who were exploring new forms of sculpture and landscape art. A central characteristic of their practice was a direct physical engagement with landscape. Fulton's time as a student at St. Martin's College of Art in London (1966-68) and his journeys in South Dakota and Montana in 1969, encouraged him to think that art could be 'how you view life', and not tied necessarily to the production of objects. He began to make short walks, and then to make photographic works about the experience of walking.

At this time, and subsequently, his practice was influenced by an unusually broad set of interests including the subject of the environment and the culture of American Indians. In 1973, having walked 1,022 miles in 47 days from Duncansby Head (near John O'Groats) to Lands End, Fulton decided to 'only make art resulting from the experience of individual walks.' Since then the act of walking has remained central to Fulton's practice. He has stated 'If I do not walk, I cannot make a work of art' and has summed up this way of thinking in the simple statement of intent: 'no walk, no work'. Although only Fulton experiences the walk itself, the texts and photographs he presents in exhibitions and books allow us to engage with his experience."

Source - article from Tate: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/hamish-fulton-walking-journey

I think Fulton's work is incredible - I love the narratives to it and they become very poetic and lyrical because of this. Also, walking is such a primal action - humans have walked from the beginning of the species' lifespan - and because of this there seems to be a sense of connecting to ancient rituals or history. Similarly, walking in such old landscapes again brings this idea of ancient rituals to mind. I love these concepts - I find them very interesting as they seem to connect the whole of humanity. Furthermore his photography is beautiful - these concepts are something I have always been interested in and will want to experiment with in future in the form of photography or moving image. 

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Seven days walking and seven nights camping in a wood Scotland march - Hamish Fulton

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Turf Circle - Richard Long

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Solaris IV - Christiane Baumgartner

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Ignacia Ruiz

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Umberto Giovannini

I think that more cartoonish illustrations are more effective when drawing a place - they add more character and help emphasise the essence of it. I want to try and replicate this but in my own style. Again, the busier pieces are more attractive to me - I will try to make many marks so the final print is as complex as these.

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Beards of the World - Linocut Boy

Using a grid and the repetition of the subject (the beard) makes this piece beautifully striking. I would like to try something like this in future.

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Deep Sea Diver - Linocut Boy

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A Condor - Hamish Fulton

This work evokes the experience of a walk in Bolivia that Hamish Fulton shared with Richard Long in 1972. The photographs denote time (a setting sun or shadow line) and movement (the walk itself). The right-hand and centre photographs were taken at the same point on Illampu mountain. The shadow line is made up of reeds taken from Lake Titicaca, and pelican feathers. They were left there in the snow.

 The title refers to the bird that circled overhead during the journey. Fulton has said about works such as this: ‘What I build is an experience, not a sculpture’.

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Ankle Sutherland - Hamish Fulton

 

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Wind through the pines - Hamish Fulton

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A Circle in Ireland - Richard Long

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Circle in Africa - Richard Long

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Nachtfahrt I - IX - Christiane Baumgärtner 

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Ignacia Ruiz

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Aiste Ramaunaite - Umberto Giovannini

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Big Bunny - Linocut Boy

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Blue Turkeys - Linocut Boy

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