Collection: PART 1

Plastic Final Outcome

Takes the concept of Virgin Mary figurines in grottos and changes her for prominent Native American spirits. These will be made of plastic (the material I was given), like the traditional memorabilia. Parts of the statues will be cut up and sharp to imply the butchering of these societies and the Native American religions and culture. They will be colossal to emphasise the scale of the original massacres. 

Details
Details
Details
Details
Details
Details
Details

Want to incorporate light, unbleached colours. Gives impression the sculptures have been there for a long time and implies the length of the subjugation of the NAs. 

Details

Virgin Mary grotto at Lourdes. Like the idea of adding more shape to the piece. Will use the grotto as the outside to emphasise connection to Christianity, and the place the Native American gods inside.

Details
Details
Details
Details
Details

The Immaculate Destruction

Details

3 plastic sculptures in the North American desert, exploring the relationship between Native American culture and Christianity. 

Details

Deity 1: Glooscap (Abenaki; Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Quebec, New Brunswick)

 

The Abenaki people believe that after Tabaldak created humans, the dust from his body created Glooscap and his twin brother, Malsumis. He gave Glooscap the power to create a good world. Malsumis, on the other hand, is the opposite, and seeks evil to this day.

Glooscap learned that hunters who kill too much would destroy the ecosystem and the good world he had sought to create. Frightened at this possibility, Glooscap sought Grandmother Woodchuck (Agaskw) and asked her for advice. She plucked all the hairs out of her belly (hence the lack of hair on a woodchuck's belly) and wove them into a magical bag. Glooscap put all the game animals into the bag. He then bragged to Grandmother Woodchuck that the humans would never need to hunt again. Grandmother Woodchuck scolded him and told him that they would die without the animals. She said that they needed to hunt to remain strong. Glooscap then let the animals go.

Later, Glooscap decided to capture the great bird that Tabaldak had placed on a mountain peak, where it generated bad weather in the flapping of its wings. Glooscap caught the eagle and bound its wings and the winds ceased. Soon, the air was so hot and heavy that Glooscap could not breathe, so he loosened the bird's wings, just enough to generate enough weather so humanity could live.

Modern Abenaki believe Glooscap is very angry at the white people for not obeying the rules he set down.

SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

Details
Details

Geopoliticus Child Watching the Birth of the New Man by Salvador Dali

Details
Details

Mirage by Salvador Dali

Details
Details

Christ of Saint John on the Cross by Salvador Dali

Details
Details

The Anthropomorphic Cabinet by Dali

Details
Details

The Poetry of America by Dali

Details
Details

The Temptation of Saint Antony by Dali

Details

I took inspiration from Roman sculpture and Dali's bodies to visualise the style of Glooscap's sculpture. I want an element of surrealism but also a god-like image in his sculpture. 

Details
Details

Deity 2: Muut (southern California, northern Mexico)

 

Muut was the personification and messenger of death in the culture of the Native American Cahuilla people of southern California and northern Mexico, and was usually depicted as an owl or as the unseen hooting of owls. He was one of the most active and vividly remembered of the nukatem, a special classification of beings who were created by Mukat, the Creator figure, in the 'beginning.' Death was considered a necessary part of life by the Cahuilla, and thus Muut was seen as more of a psychopomp than a frightening grim reaper character. This role was assigned by Mukat, who argued that overpopulation would have dire consequences.

 

SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

Details
Details
Details
Details
Details

I much prefer owls in flight - the movement and the shape of their bodies seems more powerful and thus more compelling as an image. 

Details

Diety 3: Chibiabos (Kansas, Minnesota, Michigan, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Quebec)

 

Chibiabos is the beloved brother of the culture hero Nanabozho in the traditional stories of many Anishinabe communities. By some versions, Chibiabos and Nanabozho are twins; according to others, Chibiabos is Nanabozho's younger brother; and in still other tellings, Chibiabos was adopted by Nanabozho as his brother. In some communities Chibiabos, like his brother, is associated with rabbits (his name literally means "ghost rabbit"), but in others, he was a wolf spirit often represented in the physical form of a wolf. Chibiabos was murdered by water spirits (usually identified as Water Panthers or Horned Serpents), touching off a violent chain of events that included the destruction of the earth by flood. Afterwards, Nanabozho accepted that he could not bring his brother back to life, so Chibiabos became ruler of the underworld. He is portrayed as a good and kind being who takes good care of the land of the dead.

SOURCE: NATIVELANGUAGES.ORG

 

Details
Details
Details

Looking at wolves' bodies in order to determine how to draw them. Possibly on all fours while snarling.

 

Details
Details

Comments


    Add comment

    Fields marked by '*' are required.